A Great Egret With Lunch

Monday, September 21, 2020,

Like the title of this post states, this is a Great Egret with its lunch. Now, even though I am no one’s idea of an informed birder, I have spent enough time near and even on the water to recognize the bird in this photo. However, while I can identify some fish, this particular one was a mystery to me. Luckily, I know some folks that are far more informed than I am. Mike Farina is the Conservation Biologist at the Marine Nature Study Area in Oceanside, NY. Mike really knows his stuff and was able to ID this hapless fish as a female Striped Killifish, which are also known as Striped Mummichogs. I’ve been aware of Killies, as we used to call them, since I was a kid, but I had no idea they grew this large.

One of the best things about being Joe Kayaker is meeting and knowing people that are in the actual business of working with, studying, and protecting all kinds of species. These folks are amongst my heroes. Honest. Mike and John, Amber, Annie, Chris and several other fine people work hard every day to study, protect, and preserve not only the species that visit Long Island but the very habitats in which they need to thrive in. You rock guys, you really do. JK.

Up Close and Personal With a Great Egret at Frank Melville Park

Wednesday, July 31, 2019,

These are two closeup photographs of a Great Egret that I saw at Frank Melville Park in Setauket. There is a pair of these that visit the park every day. They may even live there. As you may know from reading my previous posts about Frank Melville, I am a big fan of the park. And so, apparently, are the Great Egrets and many other birds. On the same day that I took these photographs, I also saw a Kingfisher, a Green Heron, and a Black-crowned Night Heron. All are regular visitors to Frank Melville. Maybe you should visit as well. I think you’ll like it there. JK