Scratching That Itch

Thursday, October 15, 2020,

This is a juvenile Snowy Egret finding the spot. Luckily, these birds come equipped with a pair of excellent back (or neck) scratchers. And they’re very nimble. You can identify this Snowy as a juvenile by the yellow line that runs along the back of its leg. Snowy Egrets are known for their bright yellow feet aka “Golden Slippers.” Adults have all black legs but as youngsters, they have pale yellow legs. As the summer progresses, their legs lose the yellow and become black. In my mind’s eye and highly unscientific view, I imagine all that pale yellow coloration slowly draining down to their feet and concentrating into those classic Golden Slippers. JK.

JK

 

A Snowy Egret at MNSA

Thursday, October 24, 2019,

This is an immature Snowy Egret. You can tell that it’s a juvenile by the legs. Adult birds have all black legs to go with those golden feet, while this one’s legs still have some dull yellow coloration. I took this photo at the Marine Nature Study Area in Oceanside. Both of these images are the same photograph, just different crops. I couldn’t decide which I liked better so you get to see both. The closer crop above gives you a better look at this Egret’s features, including those lovely gams. Meanwhile, the image below showcases that lovely blue water that this beautiful bird is perched above. I hope you folks will enjoy both of these images. JK

JK

Fisheye

Thursday, September 6, 2018,

I have a camera lens called a fisheye. This is not it. This is a Snowy Egret that was fishing on the creek side of the bridge near the mill at Frank Melville Park. He’s just caught a fish and is in the process of getting a slap in the face for his trouble. Not to worry, he didn’t even bat an eye – well, actually, maybe he did – before readjusting his catch and swallowing it whole. JK

A Sure Sign Of Spring

Tuesday, April 15, 2014,

20140414081002-5x7w2Spring is in the air and the Ospreys are back. I’ve been missing these guys. I’ve been seeing many of my favorite migrators since mid March. On St. Patty’s Day I saw my first Greater Yellowlegs, then on the 30th a Great Egret showed up. I spied a Double-crested Cormorant fishing with the few remaining Common Mergansers on April Fool’s Day. I don’t get to see that very often. Two days later I saw an Osprey emerging from the Nissy with a silvery prize. And two days after that I saw my first Snowy Egret. The gang’s all here and I’m very happy about it. JK